New Year – New Year Celebration

New Year

New Year is the time of day at which a new calendar year begins and the calendar’s year count increments by one. 

Many cultures celebrate the event in some manner and the 1st day of January is often marked as a national holiday.

This New Years’ holiday is often marked by fireworks, parades, and reflection upon the last year while looking ahead to the future’s possibilities. Many people celebrate New Year’s in the company of loved ones, involving traditions meant to bring luck and success in the upcoming year.

Many Cultures celebrate this happy day in their own unique way.

New Year History

Mesopotamia (modern-day Iraq) instituted the concept of celebrating the new year in 2000 BC and celebrated the new year around the time of the vernal equinox, in mid-March. 

The early Roman calendar designated March 1 as the first day of the year. The calendar had just ten months, beginning with March. That the new year once began with the month of March is still reflected in some of the names of the months. September through December, our ninth through twelfth months, were originally positioned as the seventh through tenth months.

Roman legend usually credited their second king Numa with the establishment of the months of Ianuarius and Februarius. These were first placed at the end of the year, but at some point came to be considered the first two months instead.

The January Kalends came to be celebrated as the new year at some point after it became the day for the inaugurating new consuls in 153 BC. 

Romans had long dated their years by these consulships, rather than sequentially, and making the kalends of January start the new year aligned this dating. Still, private and religious celebrations around the March new year continued for some time and there is no consensus on the question of the timing for January 1’s new status. Once it became the new year, however, it became a time for family gatherings and celebrations.

At various times and in various places throughout medieval Christian Europe, the new year was celebrated on December 25 in honor of the birth of Jesus; March 1 in the old Roman style; March 25 in honor of Lady Day and the Feast of the Annunciation; and on the movable feast of Easter. These days were also astronomically and astrologically significant since, at the time of the Julian reform, March 25 had been understood as the spring equinox and December 25 as the winter solstice.

Because of the leap year error in the Julian calendar, the date of Easter had drifted backward since the First Council of Nicaea decided the computation of the date of Easter in 325. In 1582, Pope Gregory XIII declared the Gregorian calendar widely used today, correcting the error by a deletion of 10 days. The Gregorian calendar reform also restored January 1 as New Year’s Day.

The British, for example, did not adopt the reformed calendar until 1752. Until then, the British Empire  – and its American colonies – still celebrated the new year on March 25.

In Tudor England, New Year’s Day, along with Christmas Day and Twelfth Night, was celebrated as one of three main festivities among the twelve days of Christmastide. There, until the adoption of the Gregorian Calendar in 1752, the first day of the new year was the Western Christian Feast of the Annunciation, on March 25, also called “Lady Day”.

December 25. Pope Gregory acknowledged January 1 as the beginning of the new year according to his reform of the Catholic Liturgical Calendar.

New Year Celebration

New Year Celebration

January 1 represents the fresh start of a new year after a period of remembrance of the passing year, including on radio, television, and in newspapers, which starts in early December in countries around the world.

This day is traditionally a religious feast, but since the 1900s has also become an occasion to celebrate the night of December 31, called New Year’s Eve. There are fireworks at midnight at the moment the new year arrives. Watch Night services are also still observed by many.

On New Year’s Day, people in certain countries gather on beaches and run into the water to celebrate the new year. In Canada, the Republic of Ireland, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the Netherlands this is very popular. These events are sometimes known as polar bear plunges and are sometimes organized by groups to raise money for charity.

In many countries, New Year’s Eve is celebrated at evening social gatherings, where many people dance, eat, drink, and watch or light fireworks. Some Christians attend a watch night service. The celebrations generally go on past midnight into New Year’s Day, 1 January.

New Year Celebration in some Countries

London

In London, thousands gather along the Embankment on the River Thames to watch the fireworks around the London Eye. The New Year officially starts when Big Ben strikes twelve.

Scotland

In Scotland, there are many unique customs associated with the New Year. These form the Scottish celebration Hogmanay—the Scots name for New Year’s Eve. The street party in Princes Street in Edinburgh is one famous example.

Greece

In Greece and Cyprus, families and relatives switch off the lights at midnight, then celebrate by cutting the vasilopita (Basil’s pie) which usually contains one coin or equivalent. Whoever wins expects luck for the whole year.

Philippines

In the Philippines, New Year’s is considered part of the Christmas holiday. Noise is made on New Year’s Eve with firecrackers and horns to dispel evil spirits and to prevent them from bringing bad luck to the coming new year.

Tables are laden with food for the Media Noche (midnight meal), and a basket of twelve, different round fruits is displayed to symbolize prosperity in each of the coming twelve months. Public New Year’s parties are organized by city governments and are very well-attended.

Russia

In Russia and the other 14 former republics of the Soviet Union, the celebration of Novi God is greeted by fireworks and drinking champagne. Because religion was suppressed in the Soviet Union the New Year holiday took on many attributes associated with Christmas in other countries, including Christmas trees, Ded Moroz and family celebrations with lavish food and gifts. 

In Moscow, the president of Russia counts down the final seconds of the “old year”. The Kremlin’s landmark Spassky Clock Tower chimes in the new year and then the anthem starts. It is customary to make a wish while the Clock chimes. 

The Old New Year is celebrated on January 13 (equivalent to January 1 in the “old style” Julian calendar). Although not an official holiday, it marks the end of the holiday season and is usually when people take down trees and other decorations.

USA

In the United States, it is traditional to spend this occasion together with loved ones. A toast is made to the new year, with kisses, fireworks, and parties among the customs. It is popular to make a New Year’s resolution, although that is optional.

In the country’s most famous New Year celebration in New York City, the 11,875-pound, 12-foot-diameter Times Square Ball located high above One Times Square is lowered starting at 11:59 pm, with a countdown from sixty seconds until one second, when it reaches the bottom of its tower.

The arrival of the new year is announced at the stroke of midnight with fireworks, music and a live celebration that is broadcast worldwide. 

France

In France, some regard the weather as the prediction of that year: wind blowing east, the fruit will yield; wind blowing west, fish, and livestock will be bumper; wind blowing south, there will be good weather all year round and the wind blowing north, there will be crop failure. People would like to toast for the new year.

India

Most celebrations take place in major metropolitan cities like Kochi, Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai, Chandigarh, Hyderabad, Bangalore, Pune, Ahmedabad. The New Year is also celebrated in other cities and towns around the country like Agra, Bhubaneswar, Coimbatore, Cuttack, Vadodara, etc.

There are lots of shows, events, awards and parties organized all over India. Big and small celebrities and personalities perform as well as enjoy in these parties. Many Discos and Pubs organize big singers, DJs or local talent to liven up the night with their music and songs. Goa and Kerala are the most visited destination during New Year’s celebration both by Indian and foreign tourists.

Major events like live concerts and dances by Bollywood stars are also organized and attended mostly by youngsters. 

Many people across the country also follow old traditions. The Hindu community organizes Pujas for a fruitful year ahead and the Christian community often goes to church for a watch night service till midnight praying for blessing in the coming new year.

Why do we celebrate New Year?

New Year’s Eve is one of the largest global celebrations because it marks the last day of the year in the Gregorian calendar, December 31, before the New Year. Countdown to the New Year no matter where you are in the world.

It all started in 2000 BC. The ancient Mesopotamians celebrated their 12-day-long New Year’s festival of Akitu on the vernal equinox, while the Greeks partied around the winter solstice, on Dec. 20. The Roman historian Censorious, meanwhile, reported that the Egyptians celebrated another lap around the sun on July 20, according to a 1940 article in the journal Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society.

During the Roman era, March marked the beginning of the calendar. Then, in 46 B.C., Julius Caesar created the Julian calendar, which set the new year when it is celebrated today.

Different religions also celebrate their New Year’s at different times. For instance, the Jewish calendar is lunar, and its New Year’s festival, Rosh Hashanah, is typically celebrated between September and October. The Islamic calendar is lunar, and the timing of the new year can drift significantly. For instance, in 2008, the Islamic New Year was celebrated on Dec. 29, while it will come on Sept. 22 in 2017. The Chinese calendar, meanwhile, is also lunar, but the Chinese New Year falls between Jan. 21 and Feb. 20.

But even Julius Caesar couldn’t standardize the day. New Year’s celebrations continued to drift back and forth in the calendar, even landing on Christmas Day at some points, until Pope Gregory XIII implemented the Gregorian calendar in 1582. The Gregorian calendar was an attempt to make the calendar stop wandering with respect to the seasons. Because the Julian calendar had a few extra leap years than was necessary, by the 1500s, the first day of spring came 10 days earlier.

Though the selection of the new year is essentially arbitrary from a planetary perspective, there is one noteworthy astronomical event that occurs around this time: The Earth is closest to the sun in early January, a point is known as the perihelion.

21 New Year’s Resolution Ideas For Better Life. 

A New Year’s resolution is a tradition, most common in the Western Hemisphere but also found in the Eastern Hemisphere, in which a person resolves to change an undesired trait or behavior, to accomplish a personal goal or otherwise improve their lives.

  1. Promise to donate to charities more often.
  2. Improve physical well-being: eat healthy food, lose weight, exercise more, eat better, drink less alcohol, quit smoking, stop biting nails, get rid of old bad habits.
  3. Improve mental well-being: think positive, laugh more often, enjoy life.
  4. Improve finances: get out of debt, save money, make small investments.
  5. Improve career: perform better at current job, get a better job, establish your own business.
  6. Improve education: improve grades, get a better education, learn something new (such as a foreign language or music), study often, read more books, improve talents.
  7. Spend quality time with family members.
  8. Improve self: become more organized, reduce stress, be less grumpy, manage time, be more independent, perhaps watch less television, play fewer sitting-down video games
  9. Stop procrastinating: The biggest barrier that keeps most people from reaching their goals is the desire to relax and do something fun instead of working hard.
  10. Learn to be happier with your life: Even those that are in decent shape, make a good living and have stress under control can still be unhappy. It takes time and patience to learn how to find joy in the little things and not to let problems bring you down.
  11. Give up cigarettes: A bit of bad habit that a lot of people don’t know how to kick, smoking will not only endanger your health but can burn a hole in your wallet as well.
  12. Be more involved in sports or different activities.
  13. Watch less TV: The average person wastes a lot of time in front of the TV, time that could have been better spent developing skills, learning or keeping your body active.
  14. Read more: Books are an excellent way to gain a lot of knowledge on a huge variety of topics and are also a great exercise for your brain.
  15. Start saving money: Once you have your debt under control, it’s time to start putting some money aside.
  16. Learn a new language: Not only will learning a new language can help improve your communication skills, but it will also look great on your resume and possibly open up some doors for you.
  17. Strive to be more environmentally responsible.
  18. Stop being late all the time: Punctuality is a virtue that is held in high regard in our society.
  19. Start being more responsible: A big part of growing up into a mature adult is the ability to think before making a decision. It is important to take responsibility for one’s actions and avoid blaming everything on someone else.
  20. Spend less time on social media: Some people might not spend hours in front of the TV, or playing video games, but social media has become a serious addiction among a wide range of demographic
  21. Get along better with people, improve social skills, enhance social intelligence.

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